June 20 – Criminal Behaviour

Last week we watched the Charles Manson documentary.

Charles-mansonbookingphoto

Using the Ecological Model & Maslow’s Heirarchy of Needs, discuss his childhood, upbringing, past experiences, etc. that may have attributed to his social behaviour as an adult. Also, what behaviours did Charles Manson exhibit that are evidence of the characteristics of cult leadership? Remember, the characteristics of cults are as follows:

1. Members are expected to be excessively zealous and unquestioning in their commitment to the identity and leadership of the group. They must replace their own beliefs and values with those of the group.
2. Members are manipulated and exploited, and may give up their education, careers and families to work excessively long hours at group-directed tasks such as selling a quota of candy or books, fund-raising, recruiting and proselytizing.
3. Harm or the threat of harm may come to members, their families, and/or society due to inadequate medical care, poor nutrition, psychological and physical abuse, sleep deprivation, criminal activities, and so forth (Tobias and Lalich, 1994, p. 13).

NOTE: Today you’re receiving an updated Progress Report. Any outstanding assignments are DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22! We will begin final exam review tomorrow, June 21!

June 16 – Cults (Collective Behaviour)

What is a cult?

Cults are a group or movement exhibiting great or excessive devotion or dedication to some person, idea or thing, and employing unethical manipulative or coercive techniques of persuasion or control (e.g., isolation from former friends and family, debilitation, use of special methods to heighten suggestibility and subservience, powerful group pressures, information management, suspension of individuality or critical judgment, promotion of total dependency on the group and fear of leaving it), designed to advance the goals of the group’s leaders, to the actual or possible detriment of members, their families or the community (Tobias and Lalich, 1994, p. 12).

How are cults different from other groups?

Three characteristics, which may be present to a greater or lesser degree, help to distinguish cults from other communities or groups. They are:

1. Members are expected to be excessively zealous and unquestioning in their commitment to the identity and leadership of the group. They must replace their own beliefs and values with those of the group.
2. Members are manipulated and exploited, and may give up their education, careers and families to work excessively long hours at group-directed tasks such as selling a quota of candy or books, fund-raising, recruiting and proselytizing.
3. Harm or the threat of harm may come to members, their families, and/or society due to inadequate medical care, poor nutrition, psychological and physical abuse, sleep deprivation, criminal activities, and so forth (Tobias and Lalich, 1994, p. 13).

June 10 – Collective Behaviour

Yesterday we discussed the idea of collective behaviour and came up with a class definition for collective behaviour: “A collection of unwritten rules and norms followed by a group of people who share common beliefs, values, and interests, with the goal of inter-stimulation.” We also discussed a number of examples of collective behaviours: gangs, religious groups, protesters, jocks, etc. We will finish the hand out about collective behaviours when I return on Tuesday.

Today, you’re going to investigate the collective behaviour of gangs in our society. Using various resources online, create a blog post that includes pictures, links, videos, etc. and answers these questions in paragraph form (rather than point form, please): Why do people join gangs? How prevalent are gangs in Canadia society? What about in Saskatchewan? What kinds of behaviours do gang members exhibit? Are there protocols (rules) that gang members must follow?

Here is a good start for your gang behaviour information. Here is another helpful link.

Don’t forget, you’re going to be marked according to the blog post rubric with emphasis on the content.

June 8 – FAMILY

Welcome to our last unit – SOCIAL ACTION AND INACTION

The first sub-topic we are going to cover is the Canadian family. What does family mean? What is a family? Is the notion of family changing in our society? How so?

In this video, uthor Joel Kotkin says that the notion of family, as we know it, is no longer a central tenet of society. People are choosing not to have children, or to delay marriage – if they marry at all. Does this spell the end of family, or is it just a re-imagining of what we’ve come to know?

As you’re watching the video and listening attentively to the fascinating conversations taking place, fill in your “Cornell Notes” pages with the new information you’re learning. Once the video is complete, you will have the rest of class to answer reflection questions on the topics. Both the Cornell Notes and the questions will be handed in before you leave today.